The Decline of Privacy

I was first introduced to the new live broadcasting app, Periscope, from a friend of mine. She showed me a live feed of a man on a scooter, speeding past the Eiffel Tower. I was immediately in awe, thinking this is the beauty of technology–being able to communicate with people across the world. We are able to connect with people with a live feed. Being as obsessed with social media as I am I broke into a cold sweat, concerned as to why I hadn’t heard of this earlier. Naturally I downloaded the app and signed myself up, intrigued and awestruck.

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Behold, my own Periscope.

That’s when it hit me that it’s a live feed. From strangers around the world, no less. It’s one thing to have Snapchat, in which you can virtually get “snaps” from anyone as long as you accept their friendship but Periscope allows you to view a live feed from anyone without restrictions. I became skeptical. Slanted eyes, a visible frown–I questioned the motives and privacy of such an app. Of course, it shows the location of the live video so, dear readers, forget about privacy.

Privacy has become a figment of the past. It is merely a distant memory in which our elders constantly remind us we are lacking. As a communications student, I’m not as concerned with media privacy since I’m constantly logged in, have become comfortable with my name on the web and thoroughly enjoy sharing newsworthy content. Periscope, however, was a reality check. Technology has shaped our world in so many ways: how we communicate, how we view the human body, how we obtain information. Now, it shapes how we converse with virtually anyone via flawless pixels of a live feed of say, the Eiffel Tower. Amazingly concerning.

I am a true believer that technology has shaped our lives for the better and to deny oneself the benefits of media and technology is ridiculous. The concept of Periscope is intriguing and new, but I’ll probably keep my phone camera closed to the world–for now anyway.

I’m interested: what’re your thoughts on the app?

Always, Meg

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